Music

On The Record at VinylFest

OnTheRecordOnline

Stop me if you’ve heard this one:

“Louisville is the next Seattle.”

Well, guess what? I say Louisville is Louisville.

That’s why the first ever On The Record panel is devoted to this city, and a few of the biggest reasons it was what it was, is what it is, and will be what it will be.

The guests:

My dear friend Mike Bucayu, once and now again head of the revived Self Destruct Records (a label) and owner of the defunct Blue Moon Records (a store) where I got my name. Literally.

Heather Fox, the historian in charge of the Louisville Underground Music Archive (LUMA).

Sean Liter, owner of the hippest shop in town, Modern Cult.

Ed Lutz, who was the man responsible for the label Three Little Girls and Ground Zero.

Dave Rucinski, the somewhat mysterious man behind Gubbey Records.

The owner of ear-x-tacy, the store that was synonymous with Louisville music for decades, still Keeping Louisville Weird on WFPK, John Timmons.

And the survivor, the one who saw so many come and go, who rope-a-doped like Ali, who still casts a shadow long and tall from two Better Days Records locations, Mister Ben Jones.

The panel is at 2:30, August 3oth, at the Crowne Plaza Hotel. It is a part of VinylFest. One day tickets are 15 bucks, advance vouchers to get a 10 dollar ticket are available at Better Days, Modern Cult, and with Matt Anthony.

You can contact me at RockoJerome@Gmail.com or on facebook.

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Interviews, Life

Fashion View Unedited

RockoJerome

Thanks to my friends at the Voice-Tribune, I was featured prominently in last week’s “Man” issue, as the fashion icon of the week. The danger of coming off like a complete prat in waxing philosophical about my sense of style as if I’m Karl Lagerfeld or something occurred to me, but I decided to embrace it completely in the hopes that any pretentiousness would come across as tongue-in-cheek self parody. Could the person in the photo above possibly take himself seriously?

I consider “I can never tell if you’re kidding or not” to be a massive compliment. The fact is, sometimes I can’t even tell myself.

The article was on the stands all over Louisville…until today. So now I’ll share with you the full responses I wrote to the stock questions everyone gets for that weekly feature, which were edited for length as well as, in one instance, for content.

As follows:

What is your fashion view?

I always say “style over fashion.” What’s fashionable is temporary, while what’s stylish is eternal. Member’s Only jackets were fashionable and now laughable, but a basic, well cut suit is stylish, and always works. Fads have never been interesting to me, I try to gravitate towards things that I won’t look back on in ten years and say “What was I thinking?” or even worse, “Well, I was just dressing like everyone else, so it’s OK.” The old saying is “Trend is the death of the individual.” Those are words that I live by.

How do you describe your style?

I’m into a sort of perpetual business casual look with a creative slant. A few years ago, I stopped wearing jeans and T-shirts pretty much entirely. Now, there’s nothing wrong with jeans and T-shirts if that’s you. If I decided to fight that battle, I would be facing down a huge percentage of the human race. But for me, closing in on forty, I want to communicate that I’m a different person now than I was in my teens and twenties. Back then, I was heavily into Rockabilly and working a 50’s juvenile delinquent angle. A lot of denim, a lot of leather. Fun for that age, but best left behind at this point in my life, I think.

I always go for the basics first and build personal flourishes around them, and don’t mind faithful stand-bys. Best example: Years ago, I found a style of black pants that Wrangler makes that are everything I ever wanted in a pair of pants. They’re very fitted, they have a crease you could shave your face with that doesn’t bang out in the wash, you wouldn’t know that they’re Wranglers if I didn’t tell you, and they come in black. I always wear black. So I have accumulated around eight pairs in slightly different dimensions, and they’re all I wear.

I try to always look sharp and wish everyone would, because I think the world deserves to see you at your best. I always hear people say “I just want to be comfortable,” but I’m not comfortable leaving the house without being presentable. I think the sweat suit industry has done an incredible job of convincing people that if they aren’t basically wearing their pajamas perpetually, they’re being tortured. I’m only comfortable if I’ve done the best I could with what I have to work with to put the best version of me out in the world on any given day.

Who is your fashion icon?

At the risk of revealing myself as a huge geek, Harrison Ford as Han Solo from the Star Wars movies was a big sartorial influence from childhood all the way to now. If you ask the common person what he wore throughout the movies, they will probably say he always had the same thing on. That’s not the case! As every dork worthy of their DVD (or BluRay, whatever) collection will tell you, there were big differences in his outfits through each movie- the key was that the character always wore things that were characteristic of him. He’s got the parameters set, and he stays inside of them. Nothing wrong with a personal uniform…so long as it’s truly personal.

What are your favorite pieces?

There’s so many little bits and pieces, things that I wore before and wouldn’t again but recall fondly. I currently have four or five pairs of black boots in different styles, in my life I’ve probably had a dozen. One of those are a pair of harness boots that I’ve had for over 20 years that came from a trip to Mexico. They’ve been everywhere that I’ve been. If they could talk, I would be in trouble.

From the waist down, I tend to keep what I put on very simple. Shirts are where I have more fun. I like button up shirts in different prints, I’m always looking for something that conveys an Op Art effect, and I dig paisleys. Although it’s risky and a major faux pas if you get it wrong, I like Aloha Shirts during the summer months. I’ll stick my neck out for that one.

I have a couple of peacoats that I love to wear during the winter. One is an actual Naval issue that came from a military surplus store. I used to tease and give people a hard time about having knockoffs instead, until one day when I was wearing it, an elderly fella in a RETIRED NAVY cap asked me when I served. I felt about 5 inches tall. The coat might have been authentic, but I sure wasn’t! I got a more angular one from Macy’s after that, and only wear the real one when it’s very cold out.

I would be remiss if I didn’t mention my huge Ray Ban glasses. I’ve been called a hipster because of them, but I ask you: Is Michael Caine a hipster? They were recently destroyed in a car crash, and a dear friend bought me another, identical pair. It’s been said that I’m afraid of change. I would say that I don’t mind it, so long as it was my idea and I considered it very carefully.

Where is your favorite place to shop?

You know, I go all over. I’m not above getting shirts from Target or even Wal-Mart. The way I wear them, what I’ll match them with, you would never know. It’s all about weaving a tapestry. I like to hit Unique Thrift every now and then, never leave empty handed, and rarely spend more than ten dollars. Nitty Gritty is a fantastic store. I treat myself to a trip there a couple times a year. Always get, at the very least, a pocket square for around a buck and a Playboy magazine from somewhere in the sixties. A lot of my inspiration comes from the ads for clothes in those. Again, style is timeless.

What do you like to do with your free time?

I try to keep busy enough that I essentially have none. I write for fun and profit, and since that’s so isolating for a social creature like myself, I work full time engaging with the public for Lucky’s Market. Any day I’m not doing something, I’ll line up some time catching up with friends, getting into something or other. My pals are a very disparate group of people, no two of them dress alike. All together, it’s a band of misfits. I think one of the nicest things I could say for anyone is that they dress like themselves. Personal style is sacrosanct, no matter what you’re doing.

Photo and opportunity by Voice-Tribune’s Chris Humphreys. Thanks again, pal.

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